Mt. Washington-Foundation EDC

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Another Great Success on Mount Washington

Esprit de Corps Foundation Single Parents program cohort 8 last weekend March 13 – 15 successfully summitted Mount Washington in blizzard winter conditions. Friday afternoon we hiked up to the Hermit Lake Shelters and camped overnight. Saturday we started early at 6:30am climbing up the steep Lion’s Head Trail to above tree line where we got woken up by fierce 70+ km SW winds. Hats off to every one of the participants for their daring to accept such a new challenge in their lives, training hard for months and having the spirit and determination to reach there goal of climbing in winter the highest mountain in Eastern North America.

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Not only did they realize team development, character building, personal strengths, but most important of all they are an huge example and inspiration to their kids. They dream it and they have the courage to ‘go do it.’ Bravo.

Team members: , Tavia Tolleson, Stéfanie Marois,  Geneviève Goyette , Gaby Gamarra, Luc Bellemare, Marie Soleil, Kamala Balu, Stéphanie Benoit, Brigitte Casavant, Isabelle Durand, Isabelle Ouellet, Pascale Castonguay, , Sophie Rocheleau, Renaud Fanoni

EDC guides: Jimmy Innocent, Frédéric Thibodeau, Jean-François Beauchamp, Aviva Lavallée. Photographer: Gauthier Da Silva.

Myself: godfather:))

Mount Washington March 13-15/2015

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Garifuna Film Festival International

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DareToReach.ca has been invited to participate and submit 3 videos to the 2015 Garifuna Film Festival International in Venice Beach, California.

Mission: Garifuna Film Festival will allow Garifuna as well as all indigenous people and cultures to showcase the art of preserving the Garifuna culture including all indigenous cultures thru film documentaries art ,music and dance screens feature films & short films as well as share and learn from others the art of cultural preservation.

GIFF

It is an honour to submit these 3 videos:
1/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=moBJMGNSql4           The Sherpa climbing culture, Nepal, Himalayas.
2/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xKKjVGfzLr8               Papua New Guinea people and culture.
3/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFOVUDrdOPw          Maasai & Tanzania culture & people.

Reunion with Mount Everest teammates at American Alpine Club in NYC

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Wonderful weekend with climbing teammates from Everest & Cho Oyu at the American Alpine Club 2015 Annual Benefit Dinner in NYC.

The gang at Tao in NYC

The gang at Tao in NYC

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 Teammates: Jason Vandalen, Tim Igo, Mike Hamill & Greg Vernovage.

Alejandra Villagra last year summitted Mount Vinson with Jason and likewise Oksana Galchanskaya summitted Mount Kosciusko with Tim.

American Alpine Club – NYC

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With Reinhold Messner who is considered “the greatest climber in history” at the American Alpine Club – Annual Benefit Dinner Weekend.

Messner was the keynote speaker entitled ‘Moving Mountains’. He is a mountaineer, adventurer, explorer, and he is renowned for making the first solo ascent of Mount Everest without supplemental oxygen and for being the first climber to ascend all fourteen “eight-thousanders” (peaks over 8,000 metres (26,000 ft) above sea level). He is the author of at least 63 books.

Fred Beckey is honoured with the clubs 4th AAC Gold Medal award. He is an icon in the alpine world.  (American rock climber, mountaineer and author, who has made hundreds of first ascents, more than any other North American climber)

Reinhold Messner Chris Bonington Ueli Steck Fred Beckey

Reinhold Messner
Theodore Fairhurst

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Panel discussion with Sir Chris Bonington (British mountaineer, his career has included nineteen expeditions to the Himalayas, including four to Mount Everest and the first ascent of the south face of Annapurna), Ueli Steck (Swiss rock climber and mountaineer. He is famous for his speed records on the North Face trilogy in the Alps): moderated by Jim Clash.

Everest Panel Discussion with: Greg Vernovage, Melissa Arnot, Garrett Madison, Dave Hahn, Phunuru Sherpa, Ngima Sherpa: moderated by Alan Arnette.

Symposium 2015 Ecole St-Barthélemy

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Great morning speaking to the students at Ecole St. Barthélemy about the importance in life of having dreams, setting goals, healthy lifestyle and confidence to pursue anything they want in life. Cheers to each and every one of them for their inspiring questions.
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Al Hancock Interview (Canadian Hero)

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Canadian Climbing History has been made in the Himalayas

24-May-2014
 
On May 18th at 8:39 Nepal time, Monique Richard of Montréal, Quebec and Al Hancock of Edmonton, Alberta summited Makalu the fifth highest mountain in the world, at the same time becoming the first Canadians to do so in the history of the Himalayas. We are so proud to have summited and to have the honor to fly the Canadian flag high above our heads and represent every Canadian from coast to coast.
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Al Hancock’s “Big 14” Challenge

31-Oct-2014

Over the past seven years, Al Hancock has been quietly making Canadian history.
The former journeyman millwright and oil sands maintenance supervisor has summited Mount Everest, the world’s tallest peak, twice. And in the spring of 2014, along with Quebec climber Monique Richard, he made Canadian history by ascending the peak of Mount Makalu, which ranks 5th. Hancock followed that up two months later with a successful climb of the extremely challenging K2, the world’s second highest peak.

This Edmonton-based climber is on a roll. He’s successfully scaled six of the world’s 14 tallest mountains. His plan, over the next three years, is to become the first Canadian, and only the second North American, to summit all 14 of the world’s peaks over 8,000-metres.

The next leg of Hancock’s journey begins next March when he’ll travel to Nepal to tackle Annapurna and Dhaulagiri, 10th and seventh on the list, respectively.

Wonderful Sunny Day Snowshoeing

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Great day, but more importantly, great friends Martin Husar and Marc-Antoine Laporte and me snowshoeing from Mont Olympia to the Mountain Cross Lookout and back in ideal cool sunny December weather. Of course a caffé latté in St. Sauveur on the way back. Keeping in shape and enjoying the great pleasures of Nature.

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Mount Washington Single Parents

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Foundation Esprit de Corps challenge with 19 single parents. Remarkable strength of character to push through their limits to summit Mt. Washington in winter conditions and to realize what determination, focus and hard work can achieve. Team effort, team spirit and the passion of the coaches made this a reality. Bravo gang.Mont Washington Dec.2014

North Atlantic Crossing St-Malo – Quebec

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We did it! 

Team Delta: After 14 months of training, August 2nd 2014 we sailed out of St-Malo, France in a VOR 60 (Volvo Ocean Racer) Kevlar mono-hull racing sailboat called Esprit de Corps 11 across the North Atlantic to Quebec under skipper George Leblanc. We are 10 Quebec entrepreneurs who had little or no experience sailing but who recognized the great opportunity and learning experience to cross the vast ocean in such a purebred classic machine. This pedigree raced the 1998 Whitbread Round the World Race covering 39,000 nmi (nautical miles / 72,000 km) over a 9 month period. Her mast is 103 feet and she weighs in just under 30,000 lbs, and was designed to tear up the waves and push at more than 30 knots.

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Day 1 got us pounding against oncoming waves in medium light winds following west along the north Brittany coastline. It felt great to finally get going but also meant that the reality of Open Ocean and grinding cramped conditions came home to roost. Most of us including myself had the rude awakening of seasickness the first and second day. Generally our first few days were rough until our bodies settled in to the rolling swells and insomnia conditions. We had 2 revolving shifts over a 5 day period. First shift of 3 hours on deck, next 3 hours on call, followed by 6 hours off. That meant 12 hours on and 12 hours off over 24 hours. Second shift every 5th day¬ was as back-up helmsman and was 3 hours on followed by 3 hours off 24 hours consecutive. The on deck team consisted of Francois Labarre or Gilles Barbot (First Mates) rotating every 3 hours, +2 man crew + back-up helmsman. It was a well-oiled schedule prepared for surprize. George our captain was never far from view.

Besides hauling sails up and down according to wind direction and strength, tacking or jibing, keeping our bearing west at approximately 280°, always being on look-out for floating debris, we were often awesomely entertained by passing dolphin pods jumping to our delight and leading us in unison at the bow. Occasionally a whale would surface and you would see the vertical spray from its ‘blow hole’. These were the very special moments of the day to see such amazing mammals and creatures of the sea. Some of the crew saw 2 huge turtles. Most incredible to me was all the birds (different species of seagulls) that were ubiquitous even in the middle of the ocean. I never expected that. Often they would circle just above the mast as if trying to land on it. Occasionally you would see a small flock hovering just above the waves and it would mean some attack was going on just below the surface. One night against the backdrop of a full moon we saw birds that appeared like large bats flying in seemingly archaic acrobatic flight.

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We were truly all alone in the middle of the ocean. The last boat we saw was about 100 miles off the French coast and the next one about 10 days later was a few hundred miles before Newfoundland. What impressed me early one evening was a thin narrow band of reddish light on the horizon separating sky from sea. It was a 360° panoramic view the likes of which you would never see anywhere else except on such a perfect flat plane. Although alone on the sea surface, below one suspected was a living world of unimaginable proportions. This sense of awe I found enormously profound. It occurred to me at one moment lying in my bunk that my father emigrating from England at 6 months old 106 years ago with his poor family traveled the same route to the New World as I was doing. The big difference being they were fleeing poverty and I was accomplishing a goal, not to mention my father unfortunately getting polio on his boat.

Our weather conditions varied from one hot sunny day when we all jumped overboard to swim and wash ourselves in the cool ocean to a local depression with 40 knot winds. Calm, wind, sun, clouds, rain, and storm – we experienced it all. Hoisting our larger spinnaker one morning got us into serious trouble spinning out which then caused the halyard to potentially wreck the spreader bar high on the mast. George immediately recognized the ominous danger and cut the rope letting it fly downwind sporadically. We hauled it in but the line got tangled in the propeller shaft. It took 4 hours to cut the rope away under the boat by Guillaume, Alex and Robin.

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We arrived 17 days later in Rivière au Renard in Gaspé. Not the fastest time but what we could manage with the conditions. I left the boat with Manu and Robin and flew to Montreal for business reasons. The rest of the team stayed onboard and mostly motored up the St. Lawrence River to Quebec City arriving 2 ½ days later. The dynamics of our team made this journey a great success. George, Gilles and Francois empowered us through their experience and sailing wisdom. They were key to our accomplishment.

Opportunity – Voyage – Challenge. These 3 words rolled over in my mind as what this crossing meant to me.

Opportunity when Gilles Barbot invited me to be part of the first ever ‘traversée de l’Atlantique’ by Esprit de Corps. We have done a lot of challenges together over the years and this would be another first for us. Opportunity is golden and not to be taken lightly.

Voyage to me was the amazing environment of being in such a small boat sailing alone across such a vast wilderness of water totally vulnerable to Mother Nature and the unknown. You are really at the mercy of the elements and you know it when you are out there. Albeit flat, the extraordinary beauty of sunrises and sunsets, the moon, waves, wind, clouds, rain, sounds, ocean visitors all add up to a deeply personal and profound experience.

Challenge is what changes you, opens your eyes, feeds your passions, delights your senses, strengthens your resolve, tests your commitment to living. It is the messenger to living a full, happy, healthy and extraordinary life. For me personally, I needed to take this challenge on to conquer my fears of vast Open Ocean on what I called merely a beautiful ‘popsicle stick.’

North Atlantic Crossing

After 14 months of training, August 2nd 2014 we sailed out of St-Malo, France in a VOR 60 (Volvo Ocean Racer) Kevlar mono-hull racing sailboat called Esprit de Corps 11 across the North Atlantic to Quebec

Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
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Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic sunset
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic sunset
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic with dolphins
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic with dolphins
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic with dolphins
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic with dolphins
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
Sailing VOR60 across the North Atlantic
St. Malo
St. Malo
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St. Malo

 

Amazing Team: Guillaume Le Prohon, Alexandre Forgues, Véronique Labbé, Patrick Garneau, Kevin Jutras, Robin Lacasse, Patrick Brassard, Aviva Lavallée Roberts, Emmanuel Chenail, Theodore Fairhurst.

Crew Delta: Skipper George Leblanc, 1st Mates; Francois Labarre, Gilles Barbot. 2nd Mate: Gauthier Da Silva

 

New Challenge – Sail a VOR-60 across the North Atlantic

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After 14 months of training in Quebec city and Montreal, we are ready to sail. We have been mentored by skipper Georges Leblanc  (www.georgesleblanc.com/) and Francois Labarre to man one of the most sophisticated racing boats of its era, a VOR60. It is a carbon fiber mono-hull 65′ racing machine pushing a 100′ mast that sailed the 1998 Volvo Ocean Race around the world.

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We are 2 teams of 20 entrepreneurs, +skipper, 1st mate and Gilles Barbot the dreamer who made this happen. The Alpha Team of 10 are sailing east from Quebec to St-Malo, France departing July 11. The Delta Team also of 10 (myself included) sail from St-Malo to Quebec leaving August 2nd. We are passionate souls who dream of a world much bigger than ourselves. We want to explore our destinies.

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Saint-Malo is a walled port city in Brittany in northwestern France on the English Channel that was in the past notorious for piracy.  Jacques Cartier, who sailed the Saint Lawrence River and visited the sites of Quebec City and Montreal – and is thus credited as the discoverer of Canada, lived in and sailed from Saint-Malo.

 I am doing this challenge to experience and test myself on a whole new plane of adventure. We must constantly renew and invigorate ourselves to measure our inner strengths and wisdom. I always embark on these challenges on edge, allowing every cell in my body to fire up. Great challenges are opportunities to discover who we are and what we can become. As I have said so often, “we only get out of life what we are willing to put into it.”

To follow our progress – Alpha & Delta (starting August 2nd) – visit:  http://share.findmespot.com/shared/faces/viewspots.jsp?glId=0LqXr95m6cNXVGvpBmHqf9fakP7cEa5ek

and:      http://equipegleblanc.wordpress.com/

https://www.youtube.com/user/volvooceanracevideos  

Alpha Team Members: Michel Savonitto, Yann Rousselot-Pailley, Paul Alain, Eric Bélanger, Jean-Francois Audet, Yannick Pagé, Cédric Gagnon, Martin Fafard, Marc Boucher, Daniel Arguin.

Delta Team Members: Guillaume Le Prohon, Alexandre Forgues, Véronique Labbé, Patrick Garneau, Kevin Jutras, Robin Lacasse, Patrick Brassard, Aviva Lavallée Roberts, Emmanuel Chenail, Theodore Fairhurst

Crew Alpha & Delta: Skipper George Leblanc, 1st Mates; Francois Labarre, Dave Gaudreau, Gauthier Da Silva, Gilles Barbot.

Carstensz Pyramid & Kosciuszko

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Mount Carstensz Pyramid 

 

It has been an 8 year project – climbing the Seven Summits – highest mountain on every continent – but I reached that goal on the 19th March 2014. Carstensz Pyramid, 4884m, is in the western Indonesian half of the 2nd largest island in the world Papua New Guinea but simply called Papua. The other half is known as Irian Jaya or Papua New Guinea, an independent country. I left Montreal on the 7th March and flew to Bali with stopover in Doha. On the night of the 11th, I met my team of 2 Indian twin sisters, a Pakistani brother and sister, an Australian, 2 guys from United Arab Emirates, 2 other Quebecers and myself a Quebecer. All team members, as I would soon realize, are solid strong mountaineers. A rather large team but the diversity of us as it turned out worked beautifully. We caught a flight after midnight from Bali to Timika in Papua. In Timika we again flew on 2 eight passenger prop planes to Sugapa where we landed on a high mountain airstrip. Motorcycles were waiting to transport us to the local village nearby.

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A short lunch later and we were off bouncing down a really rough dirt rocky road on the motorcycles occasionally encountering roadblocks manned by locals demanding passage money. A big negotiation would then pursue until finally something was reached and we pushed on.

We finally arrived at the end of the road and then a short walk to a tiny village at the edge of the jungle. We stayed the night in a wood shelter surrounded by round straw huts and a native population awed by our presence. We felt a bit like being in a zoo – watched by all the curious.

Next morning we started hiking through the jungle and for the next 2 days we were prodding through mud at times almost knee deep. Rarely the terrain was flat, usually climbing or descending and mostly gaining altitude. Jumping rocks or balancing across fallen trees to cross over raging rivers. The first 2 days were 9 sweaty very hot humid hours.

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Day 2 it poured rain in the dense very primitive forest until we arrived at camp 2 drenched and cold but out of the deep jungle.Day 3 we climbed up to a ridge and crossed over multiple connected hills until we at last saw those spectacular white-capped mountains – our objective in the distant horizon. A short descent brought us to camp 3.

Several long days followed winding ever up, down, or around valley or hilltop constantly dealing with slippery mud, rain, steep ascents or descents until we spotted our serene Base Camp bordering a turquoise moraine lake. We had arrived into such natural beauty surrounded by towering peaks. Carstensz was now partially in view and the magnitude of the technical climb became apparent. These mountains recently formed by geological standards and are straight up very sharp rock, great for hand and foot holds but bad for slicing ropes.

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The 18th March we rested at Base Camp enjoying such phenomenal beauty.

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Next morning at 3 am on the nineteenth we hiked to the foot of Carstensz and literally began climbing 60° to 90° walls. By 10am we were high on the ridge preparing for the Tyrolean Traverse (crossing a 30m huge gap in the rock leading to the summit. Upside down but roped into our harnesses, we pulled ourselves across with our hearts pounding furiously. Next followed a few more committed suicidal jumps across gaps and around ledges until we finally reached a rocky steep pinnacle and climbed to the absolute summit.

It was a ‘slice.’ Photos, hugs and glory for a while but the obvious was still awaiting us. Down climbing factually is the most dangerous. Back over all the same obstacles, and then rappelling down +80% of this steep mountain. Some 12 hours later exhausted but relieved we rejoiced our success in Base Camp.

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Next day began the long return back out through the mud, rain and tough terrain.

At about 3:30 pm the following day (day 9), I reached the top of the ridge I earlier mentioned (day 3), had a snack and drank most of my water, expecting to make the long traverse over the ridge and descent to our next camp at the edge of the jungle in about 1 ½ hours. It didn’t go that way. Unknown to me, there was a 2nd older trail leading off in another direction that unfortunately I followed. I was exhausted after a very long day yet happily visualizing dinner and my warm sleeping bag.

By about 5 pm I came to realize I was off-track. I also realized I did not have enough time left in the day to retrace my steps back up the ridge to my last absolute reference point. My best gamble I decided was to continue climbing down the mountain and hope this trail would merge with the correct one before or near the valley river below. I decided I had nothing to lose following this strategy provided I went slowly and did not hurt myself. Evidently, a twisted ancle or broken leg could end up fatal since I would unlikely ever be found.

At 6:30 pm the game was over. Darkness had set in, and I knew I was spending the night out alone without shelter, food or water. After a couple of expletives, I was resolved to my fate. Essentially, I had been preparing myself for years for such an event. Often back home in Quebec in winter, I would go out snowshoeing or back-country skiing and purposely get myself lost, and then about an hour or two before dark I would sit down and calmly evaluate all the signs using my compass, shadow of the sun, etc. to decide on a strategy to find my way back out of the woods before dark. I have spent a huge amount of time alone in nature hiking, mountain biking, skiing, snowshoeing so I was not afraid. In fact I was pretty psychologically positive about this new experience. I put on my Gore-Tex jacket and pants, emptied my pack so I could lie on it, opened my umbrella and got under it. Of course, the rain started immediately.

It became very clear to me what plan of action I needed to put in place at dawn. I must stop descending into the unknown and re-climb up to the ridge and over to the last known reference point. I figured it would take about 2 ½ hours which would also coincide with any rescue effort by my team starting at dawn. I would properly place myself in view and/or return to the correct path.

The night was long but the sweet amazing sounds of the alpine / jungle were an amazing delightful symphony to my ears. It rained off and on but I managed to keep relatively dry.

At first light I was marching back-up to the ridge according to plan. It was sunny, I was in good spirits. I was convinced I would be found or find the right trail.

Not far below the ridge I heard human voices. I immediately yelled out. Poxi, our guide and some of the porters had been in shifts during the night and early morning searching for me. Some had tears in their eyes when they saw me. Not only was I relieved but deeply moved by these people. They may live a simple life but peoples values and emotions are the same the world over – people are people, regardless where they live or what education they have. It touched me deeply.

The balance of the trip was mostly uneventful save for the constant mud and rain and long days.

More photos and a video will follow when I get home.

Team: Francois Houde, Catherine Dupasquier, Tashi & Nungshi Malik, Mirza Ali, Samina Khayal, Dan Bull, Saeed Almemari, Hamad Almazronic, and myself Theodore Fairhurst. Guides: Poxi Dainga, Meds Pesak, Pegi Landah.

Carstensz Pyramid

Mount Carstensz Pyramid- Tyrolean Traverse
Mount Carstensz Pyramid- Tyrolean Traverse
Mount Carstensz Pyramid- Tyrolean Traverse
Mount Carstensz Pyramid- Tyrolean Traverse
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Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid - Tyrolean Traverse
Mount Carstensz Pyramid - Tyrolean Traverse
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Mount Carstensz Pyramid near summit
Mount Carstensz Pyramid near summit
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Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid - Tyrolean Traverse
Mount Carstensz Pyramid - Tyrolean Traverse
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Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid
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Mount Carstensz summit
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Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Papua New Guinea
Papua New Guinea
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Mount Carstensz Pyramid
Mount Carstensz Pyramid
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Papua New Guinea village
Papua New Guinea village
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Papua New Guinea
Mount Carstensz Pyramid summit
Mount Carstensz Pyramid summit
Mount Carstensz Pyramid near summit
Mount Carstensz Pyramid near summit

 

April 10, 2014

Mount Kosciuszko

As mentioned above, there is some controversy whether Mount Kosciusko 2,228 meters (7,310 ft.) in the Australian Mainland or Mount Carstensz Pyramid 4,884 m (16,024 ft.) in the Australian Continent on the island of New Guinea which lies on the Australian Continental Shelf is really the 7th Summit. Most serious climbers will now climb both mountains.

I summitted Kosciuszko April 10, 2014 with my partner in life Rosanna Grande. It was a miserable cold, rainy, windy April day with very little visibility. We were soaked to the bone and only descended the mountain after dark.

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Back Country Nordic Skiing and Snowshoeing

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Great weekend of back country skiing and snowshoeing in the Laurentians north of Montreal with Rosanna (Grande) and wonderful friends Hal Myers, Roz Turgeon, Marc-Antoine Laporte. Getting trained and ready to climb Carstensz Pyramid in Papua New Guinea leaving March 7. I will have 5 days minimum hiking through the jungle to reach Carstensz base camp. Fist time for me spending this much time in the jungle and it will be quite a contrast with our winter here.
Rosanna and Ted FairhurstRosanna GrandeSnowshoeingMarc-Antoine Laporte & Theodore Fairhursttheodore fairhurstMarc-Antoine Laporte

Welcome World

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Dare To Reach is Re-Structured & Re-Born

Mission Statement:

Be bold and always reach for something bigger than yourself. It is not about climbing the biggest mountain, it is about attempting to reach your best at whatever challenge you dare. It is our personal search for balance and meaning in life.

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My Personal goals for 2014:

1/ March 7th I am leaving to attempt to climb Carstensz Pyramid in Papua New Guinea. It is my 7th and final summit [Seven Summits (highest mountain on all 7 continents)]. Asia, Antarctica, North America, South America, Africa, Europe, Australasia.

2/ Sail across the North Atlantic from St. Malo, France to Quebec City August 2014.

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Many thanks to DeuxPointZero (Fabrice Beaucourt & Emmanuelle Vincent) for their passion, patience and excellence to build this most beautiful website platform.

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My deepest gratitude goes to my dear friend Martin Husar. He is the mastermind and genius of concept and design of this site. Without him squeezing precious moments from his busy life DareToReach simply wouldn’t be of this magnitude. Thank you dearly.

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Finally, this site is for YOU, whether you are ten years old or one hundred, we all need to feel alive, we all need to challenge ourselves to find out who we are; what we are made of; and we need to reach for our goals and dreams.